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Real Research Experience at Gingin Science Festival

Gingin Science Festival will run from 10:00 am until 4:00 pm on Saturday 19 and Sunday 20 August. Visitors will be able to experience real science at The Australian International Gravitational Observatory (AIGO) and follow up by exploring the Gravity Discovery Centre & Observatory.

When: Saturday, August 19 2017 till Sunday, August 20 2017. 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM
Where: Gravity Precinct
1098 Miltary Road, Yeal, WA, 6503
Topic: Environment and nature, Space and astronomy
Cost: Hands on Science at AIGO is free. Normal entry prices apply for the GDC & Observatory.
Bookings: 08 9575 7577
bookings@gravitycentre.com.au
Other: Wheelchair access
Social Media: Facebook
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Gingin Science festival 2017 will run on the 19 and 20 August  at the Gravity Discovery Centre and Observatory and The Australian International Gravitational Observatory (AIGO), both located in the Gravity Precinct.

This is an amazing opportunity to find out about science and have loads of fun at the same time.

Visitors will be able to experience real research at the operational research centre The Australian International Gravitational Observatory (AIGO).

There will be team of UWA Physicists on site to demonstrate the ‘Sounds of the Universe’, and role play Einsteins amazing predictions. In addition there will be opportunities to Gravitational Wave Detectors, Learn about Black Holes and measure light.

The Gravity Discovery Centre and Observatory will also be open to further explore the scientific wonders of Gravitational Wave Discovery, Einstein’s Theories and the Wonders of the Universe. The Leaning Tower of Gingin will showcase Galileo’s Gravity experiment.

This event is suitable for all ages and will run from 10:00 am until 4:00 pm each day.

Contact details:

Jan Devlin
Gingin Science Festival
Email: manager@gravitycentre.com.au
Phone: 08 9575 7577
Mobile: 0422 448 875

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