Skip to content

Science week event search

No search results.
Features

From the Moon to the Murchison

Join scientists and engineers from CSIRO and the Curtin Institute of Radio Astronomy for a night of inspiring astronomy talks. Hear about the exciting early discoveries of the Square Kilometre Array pre-cursor instruments and what will be the biggest science project on the planet.

When: Thursday, August 15 2019. 6:00 PM to 7:30 PM
Download event for your calendar
Where: Museum of Geraldton
2 Museum Place, Geraldton, WA, 6530
Topic: Space and astronomy
Cost: Free
Bookings: https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/from-the-moon-to-the-murchison-tickets-66085626889
Social Media: Facebook
Twitter

Join scientists and engineers from CSIRO and the Curtin Institute of Radio Astronomy for a night of inspiring astronomy talks. Hear about the exciting early discoveries of the Square Kilometre Array pre-cursor instruments and what will be the biggest science project on the planet, in our own backyard. RSVP via Eventbrite.

Rob Hollow
Parkes, Apollo and Asteroids

Australian facilities including Carnarvon, Honeysuckle Creek and Parkes played a vital role in the Apollo missions. Made famous by “The Dish” we’ll separate some facts from fiction about the role of Parkes in the historic Apollo 11 moonwalk. Parkes’s role in space exploration didn’t stop 50 years ago though. Some other missions will be covered including the recent Voyager 2 observations. The role of CSIRO radio telescopes at Parkes, Narrabri plus the Deep Space Communication Complex near Canberra in monitoring near Earth asteroids provides an interesting example of current space science.

Robert Hollow is the Education and Outreach Specialist with CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science. He has extensive experience in teaching, curriculum development and delivering professional development for teachers. Robert runs the innovative PULSE@Parkes program which gives students the opportunity to observe pulsars remotely in real time with the 64m Parkes radio telescope, scheme that has run across Australia and around the world. He has been involved in outreach and education activities in the Mid West since 2006.

Rob is an internationally recognised astronomy educator, speaking at many conferences and workshops. He is a committee member for the International Astronomical Union’s Commission C1 Astronomy Education and Development and on the Editorial Board for the IAU’s AstroEDU.

Chenoa Tremblay
The telescope in our backyard

Scientists are naturally curious people, and we have a lot of questions regarding planets inside and outside our solar system, stars, and galaxies. When we can’t send a probe to these regions we rely on detecting the signals emitted by these objects with telescopes.  The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) is our local telescope used to explore and study the vastness of space and time.  We will discuss this wonderful new and novel telescope sitting in our backyard and what questions scientists are answering by using it.

Chenoa Tremblay is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science.  She has a long history of working as a spectroscopist within corporate research and development utilising equipment from across the electromagnetic spectrum and a project manager to integrate new technology developed in academic research into industry. She recently completed a PhD at Curtin University and is working to use the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) and Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) to study molecules and atoms at frequencies from half that of your microwave (~1GHz) to below the frequency of your car radio (~70MHz).

She has years of outreach experience working with career nights, public talks, participating in astronomy and chemistry events, speaking on podcasts about science and participating in the STEM Professionals in Schools program. Chenoa is internationally recognised for her expertise in chemistry and astronomy with being invited to speak at national and international conferences each year across multiple academic disciplines.

Suzy Jackson
Exploring deep space from WA

WA facilities have been involved in every step humanity has made to explore our solar system. From the beginnings at Muchea and Carnarvon supporting Mercury, Gemini and Apollo, to the latest missions to Mars, Mercury, the sun, asteroids, comets and the outer planets, we’ve been intimately involved with missions for NASA and the European Space Agency. We’ll cover some of the highlights of our explorations, including the Rosetta mission to land on a comet, Mars Express, BepiColombo, and the role the New Norcia Deep Space Tracking Station takes in supporting these missions.

Mia Walker

Mia is a project officer for the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA). She grew up in Geraldton and studied electronics engineering and physics at Curtin University where she first became involved with the MWA four years ago, and has since designed and deployed instrumentation for the telescope.

Susannah Keel

Susie has worked as a research assistant and associate with ASKAP and the MWA for the past three years, processing and analysing images of the radio sky. She recently graduated with a physics degree and moved from New Zealand to specialise in astrophysics at Curtin University, where she is currently an Honours student.

Contact details:

Emma Jackson
Pollinators Inc
Email: learning@pollinators.org.au
Phone: 0468 469 720

Feature image for From the Moon to the Murchison
Loading map...